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Resource Overview

This section provides background information about Health Information Exchange (HIE), including key terms and concepts, and where more information could be found.

What? - Description of HIE Resources
Insights from the Field: Key Considerations for Implementing Health Information Exchange
Insights from the Field: Key Considerations for Implementing Health Information Exchange

Insights from the Field: Key Considerations for Implementing Health Information Exchange

As medical care facilities seek to support patient safety and be responsive to their complete medical needs and histories, health centers also recognize that establishing an infrastructure for data sharing must be a top priority. Better practices for Health Information Exchange (HIE) increase patient wellbeing by giving providers more complete information for clinical decision making, eliminating unnecessary procedures and tests, reducing the burden of paperwork, and lowering costs. In 2020, HITEQ interviewed five groups that implemented clinical data sharing infrastructure in health care settings, including Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). A set of example use cases were developed from these interviews, and we identified ten themes that may help guide other organizations interested in implementing HIE. Information from 1424 qualified health centers and health center look-alikes from the CY2019 Uniform Data Set also informed the current impact of data sharing, indicating that technology and potential workflows exist to support HIE within FQHCs.

View the key considerations gleaned from this research to identify lessons learned related to establishing HIE within a health center setting. The resource is available in the Documents to Download section below.

Data Types and Sources for HIE
Data Types and Sources for HIE

Data Types and Sources for HIE

This document introduces health centers to key data types as defined by ONC’s HIE roadmap, and also lists typical sources where these data may be found.

Modified Stage 2 Meaningful Use for Dentists
Modified Stage 2 Meaningful Use for Dentists

Modified Stage 2 Meaningful Use for Dentists

Dentists are required to meet the same objectives and measures for Meaningful Use as all other eligible professionals (EP). However, there are exclusions available for several of the objectives and measures for which dentists are commonly, though not universally, eligible. This resource shares the experiences from the Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association.

Moving Integrated Care Delivery Forward with FHIR
Moving Integrated Care Delivery Forward with FHIR

Moving Integrated Care Delivery Forward with FHIR

In this session, we will start with an overview of contemporary health care interoperability.  We will cover the basics of APIs, FHIR, and complementary technologies and the operational capabilities they bring. Examples of how other industries have used similar technologies and approaches will be high-lighted.

Once the foundation is set, we will then proceed into how the health care space is adopting the technology.  We will cover how the HL7 FHIR accelerators use the FHIR ‘building blocks’ to create use cases and implementation guides.  We will walk through several practical examples of using these technologies to help with real world problem such as prior authorization. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Foundational understanding of APIs and FHIR and complementary technologies
  • Understanding of how these approaches are being used across the industry to solve real world problems
  • Steps for evaluating if/how FHIR should be on your roadmap

Speaker: Patrick Murta, Chief Interoperability Architect and Fellow

Acknowledgements

This resource collection was compiled by the HITEQ Center staff with guidance from HITEQ Advisory Committee members and collaborators of the HITEQ Center.

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The Quadruple Aim
Quadruple Aim

A Conceptual Framework

Improving the U.S. health care system requires four aims: improving the experience of care, improving the health of populations, reducing per capita costs and improving care team well-being. HITEQ Center resources seek to provide content and direction aligned with the goals of the Quadruple Aim

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